Dec 13, 2019  
2006-2007 Student Handbook 
    
2006-2007 Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Appendices


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         Appendix A

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Academic Integrity

Avoiding Plagiarism

According to the USP Student Handbook, “Academic cheating includes (but is not limited to) the following: falsification of laboratory data, bringing unauthorized material to an examination seat, copying another student’s work on an examination, misrepresenting someone else’s work as one’s own (including borrowing or purchasing term papers), and plagiarism.” Any questions or concerns regarding a student’s academic integrity will be reviewed using the Student Conduct Policy (pages 39-64).

At USP, as in all institutions of higher learning, ideas are highly valued, and so is the individual who expresses those ideas. In both a legal and moral sense, words and ideas are the property of their authors. Plagiarism is the theft of that property. When you plagiarize, you are presenting someone else’s words and/or ideas as if they are your own. This situation applies to all printed material as well as to works and ideas found through electronic sources.

Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional. In either case, the penalty for plagiarism can be severe, including failure in the course, and/or expulsion from the institution. While the various disciplines differ in the specific formats that they use to cite sources, they share a commitment to academic integrity and to the requirement that students use source material correctly. If you have questions about avoiding plagiarism in an assignment for a specific course, ask your professor. You can get assistance with correct documentation at the Writing Center.

Common Knowledge

In general, you are expected to show the source of all information (including facts, statistics, opinions, theories, lines of argument, examples, research results, etc.) except common knowledge. The definition of “common knowledge” may vary according to the expertise of the writer and reader; however, information may be considered to be common knowledge if it meets one of the following requirements:

 

  • It is repeated in many sources.
  • It would be known by an ordinary educated person who had not researched the subject.

For example, the date (December 7, 1941) of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is common knowledge, no source would be given for this information. However, a specific historian’s opinion that the U.S. military should have been better prepared for the attack would not be considered common knowledge, and a source should be given for this view.

Paraphrase

Putting someone else’s ideas in your own words is paraphrasing. Usually, a paraphrase is about the length as the original. Careless paraphrasing can lead to plagiarism. When you paraphrase, paraphrase completely. This means:

 

  • Don’t use the original sentence structure.
  • Don’t simply substitute a few words here and there.
  • Avoid using any of the author’s key words or unusual words.

Disciplines vary in the amount of the original language that you are permitted to use without quotation; check with your professor. In any case, if it is difficult or impossible to paraphrase certain language, then quote it exactly, and use quotation marks.

A good paraphrase takes work. An effective method is to read the original sentence, think about its meaning, look away from the original, write the idea in your own words, and then check your version against the original to be sure that you have not accidently used too much of the original language.

Here are some examples of acceptable and unacceptable paraphrases:

Original Version:

The craft of hurricane forecasting advanced rapidly in the sixties and early seventies, thanks to fast computers and new atmospheric modeling techniques. Now there is a lull in the progress, strangely parallel to the lull in the storm cycle. The National Hurricane Warning Center shoots for a 24-hour warning period, with 12 daylight hours for evacuation. At that remove, it can usually predict landfall within 100 miles either way. Longer lead times mean much larger landfall error, and that is counterproductive. He who misses his predictions cries wolf.

(From “Our Barrier Islands”, by William H. MacLeish. Smithsonian, Sept. 1980, p. 54.)

Unacceptable Paraphrase:

(Plagiarized sections are in bold, italic type)

Hurricane forecasting made rapid progress in the 60’s and 70’s due to fast computers and new atmospheric techniques, but there is now a lull in the progress. The Warning Center tries for a 24-hour warning period, including 12 hours of daylight. That close to the storm’s arrival, the Warning Center can usually predict landfall within 100 miles either way. If lead times are longer, there will be a much larger error, which will be counterproductive. (MacLeish, 54).

Explanation:

Many phrases are stolen from the original. Leaving out or changing a word here and there (for example, much larger landfall error has become much larger error) is not acceptable. Also, the plagiarized version duplicates the sentence structure of the original, which is not permitted. Even though the author (MacLeish) is supplied, the paraphrase is unacceptable.

Acceptable Paraphrase:

During the past thirty years, powerful computers and new techniques which allow modeling of the atmosphere have significantly increased the accuracy of hurricane forecasting, though there have been no improvements in forecasting during the past few years. However, now it is possible to predict where a hurricane will hit land with an error of not more than 100 miles if a warning of 24 hours is allowed. If more than 24 hours is required, the error will be greater. Repeated forecasting errors will cause the public to ignore the warnings. (MacLeish, 54).

Explanation:

This version uses different language and sentence structure from that of the original. Note: Even when your paraphrase is acceptable, you must show the source of the ideas. Putting ideas into your own words does not make those ideas your own. They are still the property of their originator, who must be given credit. The reference to MacLeish provides the credit.

Summary

A summary briefly conveys in your own words the main idea of a passage. Like paraphrasing, careless summarizing can lead to plagiarism. The same rules apply as in paraphrasing: use your own language and sentence structure, and give credit to the originator of the ideas. Here are examples of acceptable and unacceptable summaries of the MacLeish passage given above:

Unacceptable Summary:

(Plagiarized passages are in bold, italic type)

Hurricane warnings can be provided within a 24-hour warning period, with 12 hours of daylight for evacuation, and can identify landfall within 100 miles. (MacLeish, 54).

Acceptable Summary:

Using computers and new techniques which allow modeling of the atmosphere, forecasters can now provide 24-hour hurricane warning and predict where a storm will hit with an error of not more than 100 miles. (MacLeish, 54).

An Example from Science

From Campbell, Neil A. Biology, 3rd ed. Redwood City, CA; Benjamin/Cummings, 1993)

Original Version:

The chemical behavior of carbon makes it exceptionally versatile as a building block in molecular architecture. It can form four covalent bonds, link together into intricate molecular skeletons, and join with several other elements. The versatility of carbon makes possible the great diversity of organize molecules, each with special properties that emerge from the unique arrangement of its carbon skeleton and the functional groups appended to that skeleton. At the foundation of all biological diversity lies this variation at the molecular level. (Campbell, 61).

Acceptable Summary:

Biological diversity has its molecular basis in carbon’s ability to form an incredible array of molecules with characteristic shapes and chemical properties. (Campbell 63).

Combining Paraphrase and/or Summary with Quotation

When you want to include some of the original language of the source, you may combine paraphrase and/or summary with quotation. Here is an example of an acceptable summary which includes a quotation from the original version presented above.

The public depends on accurate, timely hurricane forecasting. When the forecasts are repeatedly wrong, the public will stop believing in them: “He who misses the predictions cries wolf “. (MacLeish 54).

Explanations and examples in this section have been obtained from the USP Writing Center and have been adapted from the following:

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 4th ed.
New York. Modern Language Association: 1995.

Leggett, Glenn, et. al. Prentice Hall Handbook for Writers. 10th ed.
Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988.

Mulderig, Gerald, P., and Langdon Elsbree. The Heath Handbook. 13th ed.
Lexington, MA: 1995:77.

          Appendix B

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TUITION FEES & REFUNDS
2006- 2007

TUITION

 

Semester

Year

Full-time

 

 

Undergraduate

$12,072

$24,144

Undergraduate - professional years (a)

13,279

26,558

Masters of Occupational Therapy (Post Baccalaureate) (b)

13,279

26,558

Part-time (per credit)

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate

1,006

Professional years

1,107

Masters of Occupational Therapy (Post Baccalaureate) (b)

1,107

Graduate and Post Baccalaureate (per credit) (c)

 

 

 

 

Executive MBA in Pharmaceutical Business

1,628

On Line MBA in Pharmaceutical Business

1,628

Graduate & Flex PharmD

1,058

Post Baccalaureate Science Teacher Certification

529

Summer Special Misher Arts and Science Undergraduate Courses (per credit)

300

 

(a) Applies to post 2nd-year Pharmacy and Occupational Therapy and post 3rd-year Physical Therapy. Amount does not include any tuition charge for mandatory winter and summer sessions. Students in their 6th year of Pharmacy will be billed tuition and fees in three equal installments of $12,542.67 (tuition) and $546.00 (fees) for summer, fall, and spring terms.

(b) Amount does not include any tuition charge for mandatory winter and summer sessions.

(c) No General Fee for these courses.

 

Registration Credit Limits

 

No undergraduate/professional student is permitted to register for more than 20 credit hours per semester without written permission from the dean of the college in which the student is pursuing a degree. If permission is granted, the student will be assessed the appropriate per credit rate for each credit hour in excess of 20 credit hours per semester.

 

 

FEES

 

 

Semester

 

Year

 

General Fee Undergraduate & Professional (full-time)

$624

$1,248

 

 

General Fee Undergraduate & Professional (per credit)

39

 

 

Late Payment Fee (assessed at $100 per month)

 

 

 

Auditing Course Fee

 

Undergraduate/professional students who audit a course without exceeding the 20-credit limit will not be charged additional tuition. Part-time students will be charged for audited courses at 50% of the applicable part-time rate plus full general fee; overload charges will be computed in the same way for full-time students whose audited courses result in an excess of 20 credits per semester.

Since graduate courses are charged entirely on a per-credit basis, audited courses will be charged at 50% of the applicable per-credit rate.

 

Residence Halls

 

 

Semester

 

Year(d)

Triple Room

$2,429

$4,858

 

Double Room

3,035

6,070

 

Single Room

3,793

7,586

 

Alexandria - 12-month Single (e)

 

7,880

 
Room Security Deposit  

175

 

 

(d) Fall and Spring Semesters only; does not include inter-sessions or summer sessions (see rates below), except as noted for Alexandria residents on 12-month plan.

(e) Billing: Annual rate divided into three equal charges billed summer, fall, and spring)

 

Board Plans

 

 

Semester

Year

Board Plan # 1: 19 meals/7 days

1,933

3,866

 

 

Board Plan # 2: 175 meals per semester/$100 declining balance

(available only to returning students)

1,933

3,866

 

 

Board Plan # 3: declining balance (minimum)

(available only for commuters, Alexandria Hall residents, and Osol Hall residents with kitchen facilities who meet the terms under Condition of Occupancy on back of the Housing Agreement)

239

478

 

 

Summer 2006 Room and Board Rates

Monday, May 15 through Friday, August 18 (including weekends - with exception of the Memorial Day and July 4th holiday weekends)

Option 1 $1,263 per seven week summer session
     Wilson Student Center, double occupancy - With meals

 

Option 2 $1,535 per seven week summer session
     Wilson Student Center, single occupancy - With meals

Meals for Summer Sessions include Monday breakfast thru Friday lunch only. Dining Services does not operate on weekends during summer. Weekend meals will be the responsibility of individual summer residents.

 

The University Administration reserves the right to make changes in tuition, fees, and room and board charges. 

REFUNDS 

A student who leaves the University without obtaining Withdrawn status and without completing the semester, or who is dismissed from the University for disciplinary reasons or scholastic deficiency is not entitled to any refund.

 

Refunds to students who officially withdraw from the University will be made according to the schedule that follows. Regardless of the reason for vacating, refunds will not be made for unused dormitory room fees, except for official withdrawal from the University. Such refunds will be consistent with the following tuition refund schedule. Pro rata refunds, less processing fees, will be made for meal plan fees, based on expected patterns of usage. Standard declining balance plan account and all-campus account balances are maintained from semester to semester and from year to year. When a student leaves the University for any reason, a credit to the student’s tuition account will be granted less a $25.00 service fee for standard declining balance plan accounts and a $5.00 service fee for all-campus accounts.

 

The student services/activity fee and other incidental fees are only refundable before the first day of the semester. If withdrawal is authorized by the University, a tuition refund will be made in accordance with the following schedule. The official University opening of classes and not the first day in actual attendance governs the refund computation. Courses scheduled outside the standard term calendar will be governed by policies devised for their respective programs.

 


                  Segment of Semester                              Refund

                  Before first day of class                                                              100%

                  To end of first week                                                                   90%

                  To end of second week                                                                80%

                  To end of third week                                                                  50%

                  To end of fourth week                                                                 25%

                  Beyond fourth week                                                                     No Refund

 

Under the University’s refund policy, where educational expenses of a student were satisfied in whole or in part by Title IV Student Financial Aid Programs other than the Federal Work-Study Program, a portion of the refund will be returned to the Title IV programs according to current U.S. Department of Education regulations governing refunds. Under the regulations, first priority is given to the return of funds to Title IV programs in the following order: Federal Stafford Student Loan, Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Pell Grant Program, Federal SEOG Program, and other Title IV programs. Refunding to the following financial aid programs will be in accordance with each program’s official policy: Federal Health Professions Student Loans, institutional loans, institutional scholarships and/or grants, state grants, and private scholarships. Any remaining funds will be returned to the student. Students should be aware that the regulations might prevent the refund of any personal funds used for payment of tuition and fees. In instances where a student has received a cash payment prior to the official notification of his/her withdrawal, the student may be required to return such payment to the University.

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

         Appendix C

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Academic Calendars

Academic Year 2006-2007

FALL 2006
Drop/Add Period Begins  

Monday, August 21

Orientation for Students & Families  

Friday, August 25

Classes Begin for All Students  

Monday, August 28

Labor Day Holiday (No Classes)  

Monday, September 4

Monday Schedule for Classes  

Tuesday, September 5

Drop/Add Period Ends  

Friday, September 8

Course Withdrawal Deadline  

Friday, October 6

Mid-Semester Pacing Break (No Classes)  

Monday, October 9

Fall Fest/Family Day  

Saturday, October 21

Spring Registration  

Monday-Friday, November 13-17

Residence Halls Close  

Tuesday, November 21, 5 pm

University is Open for Business  

Wednesday, November 22

Thanksgiving Recess (No Classes)  

Wednesday-Friday, November 22-24

Residence Halls Re-open  

Sunday, November 26, 3 pm

Last Day of Classes  

Friday, December 8

Final Examinations Begin  

Monday, December 11

Reading Day (No Classes or Exams)  

Wednesday, December 13

Final Examinations End  

Friday, December 15

First Semester Ends  

Friday, December 15

Residence Halls Close  

Saturday, December 16, 12 pm

 
SPRING 2007

 

Drop/Add Period Begins  

Wednesday, January 10

Fall Semester Make-Up Exams  

Thursday, January 11

Move Back to the Residence Halls  

Sunday, January 14

Classes Begin for All Students  

Monday, January 15

Drop/Add Period Ends  

Friday, January 26

Course Withdrawal Deadline  

Friday, February 23

Residence Halls Close  

Saturday, March 3, 12 pm

Spring Recess (No Classes)  

Monday - Friday, March 5-9

Residence Halls Re-open  

Sunday, March 11, 3 pm

Classes Resume  

Monday, March 12

Writing Proficiency Exam  

Thursday, March 22

Fall Registration  

Monday-Friday, April 9-13

Student Appreciation Day  

Thursday, April 26

Last Day of Classes  

Friday, April 27

Final Examinations Begin  

Monday, April 30

Reading Day (No Classes or Exams)  

Wednesday, May 2

Final Examinations End  

Friday, May 4

Second Semester Ends  

Friday, May 4

Residence Halls Close  

Saturday, May 5, 12 pm

Spring Semester Make-Up Exams  

Thursday, May 10

Academic Year 2007-2008

FALL 2007
 
Drop/Add Period Begins  

Monday, August 20

Orientation for Students & Families  

Friday, August 24

Classes Begin for All Students  

Monday, August 27

Labor Day Holiday (No Classes)  

Monday, September 3

Monday Schedule for Classes  

Tuesday, September 4

Drop/Add Period Ends  

Friday, September 7

Course Withdrawal Deadline  

Friday, October 5

Mid-Semester Pacing Break (No Classes)  

Monday, October 8

Spring Registration  

Monday-Friday, November 12-16

University is Open for Business  

Wednesday, November 21

Thanksgiving Recess (No Classes)  

Wednesday- Friday, November 21-23

Last Day of Classes  

Friday, December 7

Final Examinations Begin  

Monday, December 10

Reading Day (No Classes or Exams)  

Wednesday, December 12

Final Examinations End  

Friday, December 14

First Semester Ends  

Friday, December 14

 
SPRING 2008
 
Drop/Add Period Begins  

Wednesday, January 9

Fall Semester Make-Up Exams  

Thursday, January 10

Classes Begin for All Students  

Monday, January 14

Drop/Add Period Ends  

Friday, January 25

Course Withdrawal Deadline  

Friday, February 22

Spring Recess (No Classes)  

Monday - Friday, March 3-7

Classes Resume  

Monday, March 10

Writing Proficiency Exam  

Thursday, March 20

Fall Registration  

Monday-Friday, April 7-11

Last Day of Classes  

Friday, April 25

Final Examinations Begin  

Monday, April 28

Reading Day (No Classes or Exams)  

Wednesday, April 30

Final Examinations End  

Friday, May 2

Second Semester Ends  

Friday, May 2

Spring Semester Make-Up Exams  

Thursday, May 8